Photo Gallery - Page 11


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This was our hangout, the "cubby hole", at the southeast corner of 204th Street and Decatur Avenue, taken in 1959 or 1960. The "hole" was actually the back door to a dry cleaning establishment. It had two steps, so it was a mini-stoop. The blank wall served as a King-Queen court, although there was a slight ramp to the sidewalk there. In our time, there would be twenty or more guys and gals hanging around there in the evening. The doorway to the right was the then new Van Cott Post Office, which had been recently opened, and which replaced a few stores that had been there previously, including a shoe repair shop, a tailor, and another store that was originally a soda fountain.

--Charles Warren

Editor's Note: Some Bronxites referred to "King-Queen" as "Slug."


Bronx Beach and Pool was located on Pennyfield Avenue in the Throgs Neck section of the Bronx. This photo was taken sometime in the sixties. Bronx Beach had lockers, showers, a large pool and beach area, boardwalk, picnic tables and food concession stands. Special buses made trips from Westchester Square to the pool each day. Aquatic shows, beauty contests and other forms of entertainment were held periodically. Bronx Beach was the hub of entertainment for Throgs Neck residents and other Bronxites. To my knowledge there were no other pools in the area.

--Geri D'Amato Olbermann


This is P.S. 14, located on Bruckner Boulevard (formerly Eastern Boulevard). The photo was taken sometime in the 1960's on our last visit to the Bronx. I started school there and my husband John also attended from about the sixth grade. The Morris High School Annex was contiguous to P.S. 14.

--Geri D'Amato Olbermann


The was me on the day of my first Communion in 1968. This picture was taken in the P.S. 102 schoolyard from the Guerlain Street side of the park before the rubber mats were installed in the playground. Almost forty years later in 2004, I returned to the same spot which you can see by clicking here.

--Greg DiCarlo


This was Immaculate Conception Grammar School and Church in the north Bronx taken around 1954. The site is looking northwest and the street in the foreground is Gun Hill Road, two blocks southeast of the intersection with White Plains Road. The side street on the left was Wallace Avenue (now Capuchin Way) and a wider shot would have shown Evander Childs High School's Athletic Field just across Wallace. The apartment house in the background is part of the Gun Hill Projects at Olinville Avenue.

--John G. Nuti, Ocala, FL

Editor's Note: Actually, the Gun Hill Projects extend from Gun Hill Road south to Magenta Avenue, from White Plains Road east to Holland Avenue, and not Olinville Avenue, which is west of White Plains Road.


This was taken from my tenth floor window at 640 Adee Avenue in the Parkside Projects. It was right after a snowfall in the early 1970's. In the background you can see Barker Avenue, White Plains Road and the Burke Avenue station of the elevated IRT (#2) line. In the distant left corner are the Gun Hill Road Projects.

--Maria Mellaci, Tucson AZ

Editor's Note: The tallish building in the center (in front of the very tall building) was Oak Towers on Oak Drive and Rosewood Street. In the very distant right-rear are some of Co-Op City's towers.


This was in front of the building where we grew up, 839 Bryant Avenue, looking northwest toward Seneca Avenue. It was taken in 1947 or 1948. The building no longer exists.

--Nadine Wagner, Dix Hills, NY


This is a photo of me in my grandmother's lap alongside the vacant lot across the street from 839 Bryant Avenue. The view is looking toward Seneca Avenue and the next building, 845 Bryant Avenue, can clearly be seen. As a child I used to play cowboys and ringalivio in that vacant lot as well as go sleigh-riding down "suicide hill."

--Nadine Wagner, Dix Hills, NY


This is a picture taken in 1942. My dad says it's Intervale Avenue. My grandfather, Manny Morgan, is the second man from the left.

--Steve Morgan, Wilmington, North Carolina

Editor's Note: This picture is notable for its depiction of a Glatt Kosher butcher (very strict adherence to Jewish dietary law) with a Rabbinical certification in the window (lower right). These were quite common in the boroughs until the seventies, when the demand for Kosher meat declined significantly. Those who know Jewish dietary law might find it humorous that right next door was a dairy store!


This photo was taken from my family's apartment window in the 5th floor of 1776 Castle Hill Avenue. I believe it was taken late 1940's or early 50's, and looks out on Castle Hill Avenue. You can see St. Raymond School on the corner. My parents, the first tenants in the building, lived there for 50 years.

--Denise Cook Brennan, Rosemount, MN





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